Research

PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

Ueno, Koji, Taylor Jackson, Randi Ingram, Jessi Grace, and Emily Daina Šaras (2019). “Sexual Minority Young Adults’ Construction of Workplace Acceptance in the Era of Diversity and Inclusion.” Social Currents. https://doi.org/10.1177/2329496519888539

Ueno, Koji, Jessi Grace, and Emily Daina Šaras (2019). “Sexual orientation, partnership status, and work patterns among US young adults.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. Volume 62, August 2019, 100411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100411

Šaras, Emily Daina and Lara Perez-Felkner (2019). “Warming the Chill: Insights for Institutions and Researchers to Keep Women in STEM.” in Special Issue: Advancing Higher Education Research on Undergraduate Women in STEM. New Directions for Institutional Research. Pp. 115 – 137. https://doi.org/10.1002/ir.20278

Šaras, Emily Daina and Lara Perez-Felkner (2018). “Sociological Perspectives on Socialization.” Oxford Bibliographies in Sociology. Ed. Lynette Spillman. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756384-0155

Šaras, Emily Daina (2013). Ancient Songs at Millennial Moments. Lituanus: Lithuanian Quarterly Journal. Vol. 59, Issue 2, pp. 52-69. http://www.lituanus.org/2013/13_2_04Saras.html

About My Research Trajectory

After two years of research, opera performance, and tolerance education work in Lithuania, I earned an MA fellowship to study Sociology and Social Anthropology at Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary. My MA thesis, entitled “Sutarkim Gerai: Dialogical Relations of Legitimization Between Lithuanian State Bureaucracy and Political and Cultural Movements Through Mechanisms of Folk Music,” was an ethnographic research project that collected and ordered claims of authenticity, authority, and expertise in folk music. Through this investigation, I explored how state apparatuses engage in dialogical relationships with radical fringe groups that invoke processes of continual, mutual legitimization over time.

Today, I am a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology at Florida State University. My main research agenda focuses on social inequalities as replicated within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, particularly the university programming designed to support students from minority backgrounds. I am especially interested in processes of social reproduction within the higher education context, and the mitigation of barriers that prevent education equity through the development and assessment of strategic intervention programs.

I am currently engaged in several other qualitative and quantitative projects that explore disparities in education and employment outcomes across race, class, and gender.

%d bloggers like this: